The manager from Sèvres

  • What is the ideal example of a boss?
  • How can you be a manager employees never want to leave?
  • What are the most serious mistakes you should avoid?
SELL_13_2.jpg

The machine is ready, please sit back. We’ll now do an x-ray - for the sake of business and science. Though it’s obvious that there’s no ‘ideal’, many reach for it nonetheless. So let’s look at the model boss.

Managing emotions

Managers with high level emotional intelligence attract people who grow with them and build teams that last for many years. They activate positive emotions to support and motivate team members and to find opportunities in crisis situations. They can also filter out the negative: I feel worse at home, but I won’t bring that to the office (and vice versa); the stress comes from my superiors, but I won’t pass it on to my team. A manager who manages emotions well is predictable and builds genuine trust. People stick with them and tell them more than they would a distant pseudo-professional.

Nurturing and sponsorship

We crave feedback. We want to know where we stand, where we are on the road to our goal, and what opportunities and threats lie ahead. Feedback is invaluable - especially when starting a new job or in times of crisis. Most often, however, we are surrounded by a feedback vacuum. We receive much less than we need. A manager who sees his employees (who notices resources and small, positive changes) and who communicates with them builds an advantage: “I am glad that you’re with us. Everyone has weaker moments, but I believe you will learn positive lessons from them. From the very beginning, I saw something in you that I think will help you get back to a place where you feel comfortable.” When we appreciate (nurture) and strengthen (sponsor) employees, their engagement is at its zenith.

Helicopter view

When observing from a bird’s-eye view, a manager notices more and can anticipate upcoming opportunities and threats. They can prevent conflict and burnout in the group and recognise business opportunities that are beneficial for the team and the whole company. Managing ‘from behind a desk,’ buried in details, restricts their view. The boss responds intuitively to their team’s body language, earns their trust, and stokes their commitment to their work. A wise manager supports their own managerial intuition at the recruitment, promotion, and development stages using professional psychometric tests. This educates the group and the manager themselves and lays the foundation for development based on facts, not just subjective views.

Wykorzystałeś swój limit bezpłatnych treści

Pozostałe 77% artykułu dostępne jest dla zalogowanych użytkowników portalu. Zaloguj się, wybierz plan abonamentowy albo kup dostęp do artykułu/dokumentu.

Wybierz abonament już od 83 zł miesięcznie Pokaż abonament
Dwutygodniowy dostęp bez zobowiązań Wybieram

Abonament już od 83 zł miesięcznie

Dwutygodniowy dostęp bez zobowiązań

Pełen dostęp do wszystkich treści portalu
to koszt 83 zł miesięcznie
przy jednorazowej płatności za rok

WYBIERAM

Dwutygodniowy dostęp do wszystkich treści
portalu za 99 zł netto, które odliczymy od ceny
regularnej przy przedłużeniu abonamentu

WYBIERAM

Pełen dostęp do wszystkich treści portalu
to koszt 83 zł miesięcznie
przy jednorazowej płatności za rok

Dwutygodniowy dostęp do wszystkich treści
portalu za 99 zł netto, które odliczymy od ceny
regularnej przy przedłużeniu abonamentu

WYBIERAM